to andrea or anyone that can help


#1

Hello! I need advice on laser hair removal and pregnancy. Are they incompatible? I have posted two signs already. I am pretty anxious about this.

I need to treat a small area (face). Would this pose a risk to the fetus. Why? Also, does facial hair increase after pregnancy? if so, is this a temporary effect?

Thank you for your attention and help.


#2

Please do NOT post the same question twice in different threads. And please wait for response. You won’t get any more attention.


#3

If you have a small hair removal problem, you should be doing electrolysis on it. There is no contraindication on electrolysis and pregnancy other than breast work and any work in the area of the fetus. There really is not enough data on what the potential side effects of laser and pregnancy are at this point, but electrolysis has over 140 years of use, and study to show that it is the real thing, and that pregnant women can utilize it for their hair removal needs.

Even the Breast and area of the fetus avoidance is more about something that could happen, not something that is highly probable.


#4

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#5

James W. Walker

thank you for your reply. I had electrolysis done on the face and legs two years ago. Curiously, it worked perfectly on the legs, but not at all on the face. That is why I was considering trying laser this time.


#6

Laser is just light pulse, once its off, it’s gone. Laser is pretty safe. What can strong light beam do? It carries energy, and the energy got absorbed by hair follicle and hair bulb or wasted somewhere.

If I were you, I would have to think electrolysis twice before I go for it. Clearly, I don’t believe having current passing through body is safe, particularly when you have a baby inside.


#7

I said that if the area to be treated is small, electrolysis is the best way to go, as cost wise, small areas cost more to treat with laser than effective electrolysis with a good practitioner. Likely side effects from competent electrolysis are fewer as well. Finally, the laser weilder will eventually direct the client to “finish with electrolysis” when the treatment starts to yield the white, or clear hairs that form after a few laser treatments. Why? Because those hairs can not be treated by laser. There is no pigment to focus on, and most people don’t want a laser set to focus on the blood supply (your only other choice for creating heat in the follcile).

As a matter of fact, the path of electrical current as used in Blend or Galvanic electrolysis is only in the area of the insertion and the place where the inactive pole is placed. If the face is worked on, and the pole is placed under the neck, there is no current activity in the area of the lower body.

Thermolysis does not send any current into the body. Just radio waves, which are all around you, all the time, everyday, anyway.

What can “harmless laser light do”? First of all, light is radiation. Laser light is concentrated radiation. We know that skin cancer dehydration and color mutation of the hair are laser hair removal side effects. Laser treatments are like getting many sun burns in one shot. Finally, a recent military study found that frequent exposure to laser light actually “deletes code in the dna of the skin”. They don’t know what the long term result of this is yet, but it sounds like something I don’t want to help them find out about.

Of course, electrologists are biased because we were here when X-Ray hair Removal was all the rage. It sure worked. Treated areas did in fact loose the hair. The clients just developed radiation sickness and died of horrible cancers years later. Of course, before they died they often lost little things like thier jaw-bones.

One should also make note of the fact that although the first X-Ray Hair Removal Machine went on sale in the 1920’s and it was known that the treatment was deadly no later than the 1950’s the government did not outlaw X-Ray Hair Removal Machine Use by Non-Physicians until the LATE 70’s!

'Nuff Said?

[ June 25, 2003, 07:48 AM: Message edited by: James W. Walker VII, CPE ]


#8

</font><blockquote><font size=“1” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>quote:</font><hr /><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Finally, the laser weilder will eventually direct the client to “finish with electrolysis” when the treatment starts to yield the white, or clear hairs that form after a few laser treatments. Why? Because those hairs can not be treated by laser. There is no pigment to focus on, and most people don’t want a laser set to focus on the blood supply (your only other choice for creating heat in the follcile).</font><hr /></blockquote><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Not always true.

</font><blockquote><font size=“1” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>quote:</font><hr /><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>As a matter of fact, the path of electrical current as used in Blend or Galvanic electrolysis is only in the area of the insertion and the place where the inactive pole is placed. If the face is worked on, and the pole is placed under the neck, there is no current activity in the area of the lower body.</font><hr /></blockquote><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Yes, but why bother to have extra current passing through (part of) your body?

</font><blockquote><font size=“1” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>quote:</font><hr /><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Thermolysis does not send any current into the body. Just radio waves, which are all around you, all the time, everyday, anyway.</font><hr /></blockquote><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Interesting, basically LASER is similar to thermolysis, the wave we call it light wave or light frequency. And if someone is telling me LASER is not efficient, then thermolysis is not efficient as well plus extra scars into your body.

</font><blockquote><font size=“1” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>quote:</font><hr /><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>What can “harmless laser light do”? First of all, light is radiation. Laser light is concentrated radiation. We know that skin cancer dehydration and color mutation of the hair are laser hair removal side effects. Laser treatments are like getting many sun burns in one shot.</font><hr /></blockquote><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Pretty good points, however, not good enough to someone has background in LASER.
LASER used in LASER hair removal is not that strong, won’t cut off your flesh. Also, you only expose to each zap a tiny fraction of second.

</font><blockquote><font size=“1” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>quote:</font><hr /><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>Finally, a recent military study found that frequent exposure to laser light actually “deletes code in the dna of the skin”. They don’t know what the long term result of this is yet, but it sounds like something I don’t want to help them find out about.</font><hr /></blockquote><font size=“2” face=“Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif”>I don’t think they talking about the same LASER as being used in LASER hair removal.

Personally I don’t against people to go for electrolysis, however, if they look suitable for LASER hair removal, I will tell them to try LASER. I really don’t understand why people trying to make sound dangerous directly or indirectly? There are examples both clients (in this forum) and practitioners trying to tell others LASER is radioactive. (radiate/radiation has nothing to do with radioactive/radioactivity)

LASER hair removal has short history compared to Electrolysis, however, there’s no point to deny it completely. As I usually said, LASER is generally classified as “permanent hair reduction,” with suitable repeated treatments, “permanent hair removal” can be achieved.

There are many benefits of having LASER instead of electrolysis.