Galvanic Electrolysis Tweezing Sensation


#1

Hello everyone,

I am currently bring treated with the galvanic method. The results so far are decent, not good/not bad, and it it is super frustrating how slow it is. I’ve read a couple of threads in here that one should not feel a tweezing/pulling sensation when the hairs are removed. Personally, I have been experiencing the tweezing/pulling sensation for a majority of hairs removed, hence, I decided to ask my electrologist about it in which she responded and I quote, “since you are being treated with the galvanic method, it is normal to feel a tweezing sensation. The lye will be working its way through the folice and kill it for minutes after the needle is removed.” Is her statement correct or is she simply not treating me well?

She also claims that her galvanic machine only has one current setting, which I never heard of. Could that be true or does she simply only want to keep the current on for a longer time so the treatments will last longer?

I apologize for the unclearity in my posting. Nevertheless, all responses will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance :slight_smile:


#2

Everything your electrologist is telling you is false. If you are having a large and/or dense area treated, galvanic electrolysis is like shoveling snow with a teaspoon. Find a skilled practitioner, preferably one that offers blend or flash thermolysis. As previously noted on this site, flash thermolysis is best administered using insulated probes.


#3

Galvanic electrolysis is slow, but it is highly effective. Here’s the thing, as I was told by the maker of the digital Gentronic (16 probe) multi-needle epilator, if a little tugging is felt, not to worry because the follicle has been filled with lye and that lye will be working a little while after the probe is removed. Sounded good to me, but I still did not want tugging.

People want the hair off fast, but the multi-needle electrolysis experience communicates that electrolysis is slow. People give up hope, something that we don’t want to happen for those already depressed with a hair problem! Even though multi-needle galvanic is a fabulous modality, it has some short comings. You should overlook the shortcomings if this practitioner is the only local talent around and does this well. I would ask her if she could increase the timing so most hairs slide out easily. If she can’t do that, then look for someone that can do blend or flash thermolysis.

It actually would be a good idea to try the other modalites. Get some treatments from different practitioners. Try Blend. Try thermolysis. You may be so much happier that more hair is being removed. You might even get cleared every time you go to a session. I’m not sure if her epilator is a professional kind of epilator from what you described. I think you may deserve better?


#4

I have the advantage of remembering just which galvanic practitioner you see. Which is why I’ve been avoiding this post just a little, I dont have anything good to say about what you were told and I don’t like to speak poorly about any electrologist.

A smooth release is the best measure we have of the efficiency of epilation. A pluck is a pluck…always. While it is true that lye continues to work once the hair is removed it is no guarantee of the termination of the hair follicles ability to replicate another hair if a smooth release of the hair is not acheived.
I DO think you should try blend or thermolysis and leave that practitioner behind you. That’s just a personal opinion, but your progress is too slow to achieve what you are trying to do and I feel you will lose the motivation to do the work and spend a LOT of money in the process.

Real professional epilators have adjustable settings even hacked together ones using a car battery. That’s about all I have to say about that.


#5

She is correct that the lye will still be present in the follicle after the probe is removed, so a plucked hair could still technically be treated successfully with the galvanic energy. There is, however, no evidence that the accuracy of her insertion or the intensity of the current was sufficient enough to damage the follicle permanently.

You clearly distrust your electrologist, and I believe you have a fair reason to do so. I’ve read your threads about this clinic and seen their website, and all the staff at your clinic claim to have completed a 500-hour course across all modalities… yet they say that their DC only has one setting, that plucking is acceptable and that a male beard can only be treated with galvanic current.

Time to throw this clinic in the trash and just travel the hour or so to the next closest electrologist who offers thermolysis or blend and can treat the whole area across multiple hours if necessary.


#6

The lye works a few second after the probe is removed.
There is a “treat and wait” strategy when DC is used.This means that the hair is removed after 5-10 sec after the probe is removed. This 5-10 sec allow the lye to work and fully destroy the follicle.
If the hair is removed right after the probe is removed, part of the lye is also removed with the hair, so less lye to work in follicle.
If we wait 5 sec and remove the hair we achieve 2 things:

  1. All created lye will stay in the follicle and will work to destroy it.
  2. The hair should slide out without any resistance which will be the proof for properly treated hair.

#7

Yes Dimi, perfect!


#8

Thank you for your educational response,

I just had my first appointment (yesterday) with an electrologist practicing the thermolysis method and all the hair were removed smoothly (no tweezing sensation, yayyyyy!). I would estimate that she treated around 100-150 hairs in a 1h 30min appointment- isn’t that extremely slow considering the method (thermolysis) that she is using?

Once again, thank you for your response :slight_smile:


#9

Thank you for your educational response,

I just had my first appointment (yesterday) with an electrologist practicing the thermolysis method and all the hair were removed smoothly (no tweezing sensation, yayyyyy!). I would estimate that she treated around 100-150 hairs in a 1h 30min appointment- isn’t that extremely slow considering the method (thermolysis) that she is using?

Once again, thank you for your response :slight_smile:


#10

Yes, that is very slow for thermolysis, even the blend. It is not uncommon for flash thermolysis to treat 600-700 hair follicles per hour.


#11

2 hairs per minute ? What thermolysis is that?
With 2 hands technique and 1 sec fast blend, can you calculate theoretically how many hairs could be removed for a minute?